What topics will we explore at the 2020 district conference?

PRSA’s North Pacific District will hold its biannual conference on March 22 -23, 2020 in San Francisco, Calif., and nationwide via livestreaming. Take a look at the programming topics we’ll uncover in our next gathering.

#PRLife after 40

We’re living longer lives, which means we’re often delaying retirement, too. In overall workforce demographics, those over the age of 65 are the fastest-growing workforce segment, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Within our own industry, however, the average PR professional is 41.

We’ll hear from a panel of PR professionals who are living this reality. They’ll talk about the good, the bad and the ugly of #PRLife after 40.

Want to contribute your expertise? Complete our speaker submission form to raise your hand.

#LikeABoss: Stories from millennials in senior leadership roles

Twenty-eight percent of millennials hold management positions, and with the eldest of the cohort turning 38, they’re likely to be the leaders integrating AI and other automation into our profession, shaping the future of work. We’ll hear from some of these millennials who are shaping workplace culture, leadership and more.

Get inspired with additional reading:

Want to contribute your expertise? Complete our speaker submission form to raise your hand.

PRSA my way: Volunteers on the impact of PRSA in their lives

PRSA is an industry trade association representing the public relations profession, and it relies on member-volunteers as its primary workforce. Hear from those who contribute more than their annual dues to our Society, why they do it, and why you might want to, too.

Want to contribute your expertise? Complete our speaker submission form to raise your hand.

#SuccessStories on D&I done right

In December 2018, Forbes published it’s five predictions for diversity and inclusion (D&I) in 2019, all of which have come to pass (at least to some extent). But the article focused on the more reactive elements many organizations face when it comes to D&I. In this discussion, we’ll hear from some of the folks behind pro-active success stories, including the conditions needed for organizations to be authentically diverse and inclusive — inside and out.

Want to contribute your expertise? Complete our speaker submission form to raise your hand.

Awards season: Film PR Pros share their predictions and discuss the state of D&I behind the camera

Hear from our colleagues working in the film industry in the #metoo era. Has it impacted their approach to PR? Is the industry embracing diversity? And who will win best picture at the Oscars?

Want to contribute your expertise? Complete our speaker submission form to raise your hand.

Can’t we all just get along? The role of PR in shaping civil discourse.

Last year, MarketWatch published an article asking its readers “how biased is your news source?” The chart they shared (below) exemplifies just how challenging it is for today’s communications professionals to engage with their publics. In ye olden days, there were just three TV stations and Walter Cronkite was the most trusted man in America. As a communicator, you knew that if your message came from his lips, your constituents trusted its veracity. Today? Not so much.

How are some of our colleagues dealing with these issues — personally and professionally? What life hacks have they picked up to cut through the noise, the “fake news” and tribal mentality to have their messages delivered (and resonate) with their publics?

Honest, ethical professionals never spin, mislead or alter facts. 

– Jane Dvorak, APR, Fellow PRSA, Chair of the Society for 2017, in a PRSA statement on “alternative facts”

Want to contribute your expertise? Complete our speaker submission form to raise your hand.

The road to the White House: Journalists on their role in shaping the election

We’ll hear from some of the reporters and editors following the 2020 presidential campaign trail, getting their take on issues, tweets, and the “fourth branch of government.”

Want to contribute your expertise? Complete our speaker submission form to raise your hand.

When your brand is bigger than your government

According to a 2017 analysis by Global Justice Now found that in a review of 500 corporations and 222 countries, when comparing annual revenue the top 10 corporations are worth more than the bottom 196 governments. Further, of the top 200 economies, 79 percent of them are companies, not countries.

Put yourself in Barbara Messing’s shoes. She’s the CMO of Walmart. As an economy, for example, the retail giant is larger than Russia, India and Saudi Arabia. How does such knowledge impact the way you approach your work, counsel executive leadership and evaluate decisions? And more broadly, what does it mean for society when your brand has more resources than the G6?

We’ll hear from colleagues like Barbara who live and work in our own backyard about how they view their role, both in their organization and in our larger community.

Go down the rabbit hole: Review the full list comparing countries and companies.

Want to contribute your expertise? Complete our speaker submission form to raise your hand.

When your industry is a political punching bag: Communications strategies in health care

In 2016, Americans spent $10,348 per person, or $3.3 trillion, on health care, and the rate is only increasing, which may be why the issue (and industry) continues to play a larger role in presidential campaign platforms. But what’s it like for those of us working in fields like health care and find our communications efforts derailed by a tweet? We’ll hear from some of our colleagues who have faced such challenges — and what they did about it.

Get inspired with additional reading: Jeanne M. Lambrew, Getting Ready for Health Reform 2020: What Past Presidential Campaigns Can Teach Us (Commonwealth Fund, June 2018). https://doi.org/10.26099/k3sn-zs02

Want to contribute your expertise? Complete our speaker submission form to raise your hand.

The future of Facebook and what it means for PR everywhere

According to Mark Zuckerberg, the future of Facebook is “private, encrypted services where people can be confident what they say to each other stays secure.” But will the 15-year-old social media platform, and one of the world’s most (financially) valuable companies, be trusted by its users, and its advertisers to implement its vision? And should brands rely so heavily on this channel for marketing and communication with its stakeholders? Our panel will discuss these topics — and more — this January.

Want to contribute your expertise? Complete our speaker submission form to raise your hand.

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